Thursday, May 18

Let's Eat Part 1: Food Culture

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Food is an integral part of understanding a culture. The next few lessons are dedicated to eating. We will focus mainly on mealtimes, names, ordering food and other common phrases you should expect to hear in relation to eating.

First, we will start off with a translation exercise. See if you can follow the conversation.


Jacobo: Nangankan?
Mark: Saan pay.
Jacobo: Umayka ditoy, mangan ka pay.

Mark: Ania ti sidain?
Jacobo: Pinakbet, innapoy, ken sisig.
Mark: Kayat ko ti sisig.

Mark: Naimas. Sino ti nagluto?
Jacobo: Kasinsin ko nga ni Demy.
Mark: Naimas ti sidain.

Mark: Nabusugakon.



So how much of that did you understand? Well, check yourself.


Jacobo: Nangankan? Did you eat yet?
Mark: Saan pay. Not yet.
Jacobo: Umayka ditoy, mangan ka pay. Come here and eat.

Mark: Ania ti sidain? What is the side dish?
Jacobo: Pinakbet, innapoy, ken sisig. Pinakbet, Rice, and Sisig
Mark: Kayat ko ti sisig. I want Sisig.

Mark: Naimas. Sino ti nagluto? Yummy. Who cooked?
Jacobo: Kasinsin ko nga ni Demy. My cousin Demy
Mark: Naimas ti sidain.The side dish is yummy

Mark: Nabusugakon.I'm full.

Nangankayon? ( Nah-ngahn-kah-yon?)
Nangankan? (Nah-ngahn-kahn?)


Simply put "Have you eaten?" or as we like to say in Texas, "Have y'all eaten?". 

Filipino culture dictates that it is rude to not offer someone food, so it is customary to ask this question when you have visitors. So if you are the visitor, to avoid an embarrassing situation where food is not prepared ahead of time, it is best to answer that you have already eaten.


Wen, nanganakkon (wen, nah-ngah-nahk-con) 
Yes, I have eaten.

Wen, nangankamin (wen, nah-ngahn-kah-mean) 
Yes, we have eaten.


If it is a sincere question, you will mostly like be asked again, in which case it is okay to accept. In which you can respond with the following:


Saan pay (sah-un pie)  - Not Yet
or
Merienda lang (Mer-ree-yen-duh lung) - Snacks only


And always follow with the proper title:

Apo (elderly)
Uncle/Auntie (if they are old enough to be your auntie/uncle, you call them that)
Manang/manong (someone older)
Ading (someone younger)
Madam/Sir (Politicians, Teachers, businessman)
Lolo/Lola 

And of course, when you are done, don't forget to be thankful.

Agyamanak (ugh-yah-man-knock) - singular

Agyaman kami (ugh-yah-man-kah-mee) - plural

So next time you have to visit someone or meet up with someone, remember this simple visiting etiquette. So next week we will discuss mealtime conversations.

Inton maminsan manen,
Siak ni Gigi


NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person to say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. 


For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.

Thursday, May 11

Top 10 Must-Try Ilokano Food

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Our next lesson post topic is food. So let's talk about Ilokano food culture for a bit. Filipino's are fond of gatherings around food and if you are going to be around for the parties, you'll need to know what you are eating, right? So here are our top 10 Ilokano dishes.


Top 10 Ilokano dishes


1. Bagnet - The King of all lechons. Bagnet is a slap of Pork belly literally deep fried in its own fat, over and over to crispy perfected meaty chicharron. Then it is cut into manageable bite size pieces before taking its final dip into the boiler oil bath. They are served with spicy vinegar. It is artery clogging awesome!

Photo Courtesy of blissfulguro.com during her Vigan Food Trip.

2. Pinakbet - Veggie Delight of the North. It is a combination of vegetables cooked in bagoong (fish sauce). Bagnet is a perfect addition to this dish but some prefer to put shrimp. I used to wonder why my mom always has bittermelon, eggplant, okra, kabocha squash, and long beans in her garden. I just thought it was the basic Asian garden selection. Later on, I realized those are all the veggies to cook pinakbet! Now I get it!

Photo Courtesy of Kusina Master Recipes


3. Poki-Poki/ Poqui-Poqui - Grilled Eggplant Salad. Much like Tortang Talong except it has eggs and onions. Eggplants are grilled until the skin puff out then the toasty skin is removed. Then the mashed eggplants are pan-fried with scrambled eggs, onions and diced tomatoes. Eat dipped in soy sauce or fish sauce.

Photo Courtesy of blissfulguro.com during her Vigan Food Trip.

4. Dinardaraan - Chocolate Meat Pudding. Oh yum! that sounds good, it has chocolate and meat you say? Well, this delicious meat dish is basically sauteed pork meat cooked pork blood with vinegar added to it. The consistency and color after cooking look like chocolate, hence the name. For the most part, this dish is actually pretty good and no shouldn't have any surprise flavors.

Photo Courtesy of Get Lost to Ilocos

5. Dinakdakan - Ilokano Version of Sisig. Another Pork Goodness! So you boil a head of a pig and harvest everything except the bones from it. That includes the nose, ears, cheeks, and don't forget the brains. Some add pork belly, torched thinly sliced pork skin to the mix. Sometimes thrown into the grill for some crispiness. And sometimes, it's simply marinated in vinegar and calamansi and seasoned with onions, garlic, and salt. Either way, it's a totally awesome dish. Not convince? Well, it's the ultimate beer food. Maybe that will entice you to try. There's also beef and goat dinakdakan.

Photo Courtesy of  overseaspinoycooking.net.


6. Pinapaitan - Bitter but Famous. Pinapaitan stems from the word "Pait," which means bitter. That doesn't sound appetizing at all. Have you heard of Mexican Menudo?  Yup, it's pretty much the same soup dish. The difference is in the seasoning. Pinapaitan is an Ilokano soup dish that is mostly made with cow or goat innards and seasoned in its bile extract. First time trying it, go for the beef pinapaitan before you attempt the goat one unless you like goat meat.

Photo Courtesy of Roy Varagan of MAKAN

7. Pinikpikan - Igorot Delicacy. This is a chicken soup dish that is best made with "native" chicken or a mountain/wild chicken. The native chicken has long since been domesticated but still, it just tastes different. They have a darker meat and gamier taste. The feathers of the chicken are roasted off over open fire leaving the skin a bit torched but flavorful. It's cook for a long time to tenderize the meat and seasoned with ginger and fish sauce. Some add papaya or pepper leaves to have a bit of veggie option.

Photo Courtesy of Eat Eplore Experience.

8. Igado - Just another innards dish. Igado is a popular Ilokano dish that mostly made of liver, meat strips and sometimes other organ parts. The name comes from the Spanish word "Higado," which translate to "liver." Hence the part where it has to have liver in the ingredients. It's cooked with bell pepper, peas, and carrots.

Photo Courtesy of PanlasangPinoy.com


9. Dinengdeng - Refreshing Bean Soup dish. This soup is made with variety of green veggies cook with bagoong (fish sauce) and serve with grilled or fried fish like galunggong (roundscad), tilapia or bangus (milkfish)

Photo Courtesy of  Angsarap.net

10. Ilocos Empanada - Not your normal empanada. These empanadas are orange! They mix achuete/annatto powder into their batter flour for flavor and color. The filling consist of shredded papaya or beans sprout with eggs and sometimes longganisa sausage. They are deep fried and dipped in spicy vinegar. Aside from it being deep-fried, it's totally healthy.

Photo Courtesy of Traveler on Foot

So there you go. I hope I made you hungry because I'm feeling hungry now that I'm done with this post.

Mapannak pay agbirok iti lutuik. (I'm going to go look for something to cook)

Inton maminsan manen ( Until Next Time)

SIAK NI GIGI

Thursday, May 4

Ilokano Weather Part 2: How to say COLD in Ilokano

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COLD! COLDER! COLDEST!


 I think the chance for cold weather in my area is pretty much gone. Last week, our topic was all about the HOTNESS. Summer is approaching after all. And in the Philippines, it's hot most of the time. But there are occasions when you experience cold. 

So for this week's lesson, we are talking about COLD weather and feeling cold in general. I'll leave this vocabulary chart up here for reference. The concept is to use different words in the sentences below. 

Basic Vocabulary Chart

WEATHER TALK VOCABULARY
EnglishTagalogIlokano/IlocanoPronounce like this
HotMainitNapudot, NabaraNah-poo-doot, nah-bah-rah
ColdMalamigNalamek/NalamiisNah-lam-ehk/Nah-lam-mi-is
WetBasaBasaBah-sah
DryTuyoRagangirangRah-gah-ngee-rung
Humid/humidityPagkabasaNasalimuotNah-sah-lee-moo-ot
RainUlanTudotoo-do
SnowNiebeNiebeNee -e-be
IceYeloYeloYe-loh
StormBagyoBagioBug-yo



Tell me how COLD it is...


Lamek = COLD

Nalamek - It's cold
Nalamameken - It's already cold
Naglamek - It's very cold
Nalamlamek - It's colder (use for comparison)
Lumamek - It's going to become cold
Limamek - It became cold

Another word for Cold?

Nalamiis is another word for COLD.

Nalamiis - It's cold
Nalamiisen- It's already cold
Naglamiis- It's very cold
Nalamlamiis - It's colder (use for comparison)
Lumamiis- It's going to become cold
Limamiis - It became cold


Talking about the Weather

There is the translation following the English script and there is what English speaker would call the "backward way." Haha, well, it's actually called the reverse translation. English grammar is different from other languages.

The snow is cold ( rain = tudo, ice = yelo, food = makan)

Ti niebe ket nalamek (Tee nee-ye-beh ket nah-lahm-ehk)
Ti niebe ket nalamiis (Tee nee-ye-beh ket nah-lahm-mi-is)

The more common way to say it...

Nalamek iti niebe (Nah-lahm-ehk ee-tee nee-ye-beh)
Nalamiis iti niebe (Nah-lahm-mi-is ee-tee nee-ye-beh)
* It literally translates to ..... Cold is the snow. The verb or adjective comes before the noun.

Then there are descriptive nouns

Nalamek nga niebe (Nah-lahm-ehk tee nee-ye-beh)
Nalamiis nga niebe (Nah-lahm-mi-is tee nee-ye-beh)
*This translate to....Cold snow. When you have an adjective before a noun, you add NGA in between the words in Ilokano.

So for our lessons, we will mostly use reverse translation.

It's cold right now 

Nalamek tatta  (Nah-lahm-ehk tat-tah)
Nalamiis tatta (Nah-lahm-mi-is tat-tah)


It's already cold 

Nalameken (Nah-lahm-eh-ken)
Nalamiisen (Nah-lahm-mi-is-sen)


It's very cold today 

Naglamek tatta nga aldaw (Nug-lahm-ehk tat-tah ngah al-dao)
Naglamiis tatta nga aldaw (Nug-lahm-mi-is tat-tah ngah al-dao)
* When you want to emphasize an adjective, you use NAG instead of  NA before the adjective word. 


It's colder today

Nalamlamek tatta nga aldaw (nah-lahm-lahm-ehk tat-tah ngah al-dao)
Nalamiis tatta nga aldaw (nah-lahm-lahm-mi-is tat-tah ngah al-dao)


Wait for the climate to get cold

Urayem nga lumamek iti tiempo (Ooh-rah-yem ngah loo-mum-ehk ee-tee tee-yem-po)
Urayem nga lumamiis iti tiempo (Ooh-rah-yem ngah loo-mum-mi-is ee-tee tee-yem-po)


The climate became cold

Limamek iti tiempo ( Lee-mum-ehk ee-tee tee-yem-po)
Limamiis iti tiempo ( Lee-mum-mi-is ee-tee tee-yem-po)


I'm  cold/I'm very cold

Nalamekak/Naglamekak (Nah-lahm-ehk-ahk / Nug-lahm-ehk-ahk)
Nahlamiisak/Naglamiisak (Nah-lahm-mi-is-ahk /  Nug-lahm-mi-is-ahk)


You're cold/You're very cold 

Nalamek ka / Naglamek ka ((Nah-lahm-ehk-ka / Nug-lahm-ehk-ka)
Nalamiis ka/Naglamiis ka (Nah-lahm-mi-is ka /  Nug-lahm-mi-is ka)


I'm feeling cold 

Naglamek iti riknak - (Nug-lahm-ehk-ahk ee-tee reek-nak)
Naglamiis iti riknak - (Nug-lahm-mi-is-ahk ee-tee reek-nak)

Or you can say.....

Malamlamekak (Mah-lahm-lahm-ehk-ahk)
Malamiisanak ( Mah-poo-doo-tan-ack)


I'm going to cool off /cool down

Mapannak agpalamek - (Mah-pun-nak ugh-pah-lahm-ehk)
Mapannak agpalamiis - ( Mah-pun-nak ugh-pah-lahm-mi-is)


Nalamek and Nalamiis. If you get these two words mix up, it's okay. They literally mean the same thing. You can use them whether you're talking about the weather or how you are feeling.


COLD FOOD

The Halo-Halo is cold.
Ti Halo-halo ket nalamek/nalamiis.
*English grammar translation.

Cold is the Halo-Halo.
Nalamek/Nalamiis ti Halo-halo
*Reverse Translation. 

You will hear it both ways when the sentence format is:

The (Noun) is (adjective).

When you have an adjective before a noun, you add NGA in between the words in Ilokano

Nalamek/Nalamiis nga Halo-halo (Cold Halo-Halo)
Nalamek/Nalamiis nga Danum (Cold Water)
Nalamek/Nalamiis nga serbesa (Cold Beer)


Intayon agpalamiis. Inton Maninsan Manen!

(Let's go cool off. Until Next Time Again!)


Siak ni Gigi


NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person to say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. 

For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.

Thursday, April 27

Ilokano Weather Part 1: How to say HOT in Ilokano

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HOT! HOT! HOT!


I don't know about you but it is HOT in this part of the woods. This West Texas heat is no joke! So for this week's lesson, we are talking about the weather, HOT weather, that is.

So, How's the weather is your area? Hope it's not as scorching hot as where I am. Outside is reaching the three-digit in Fahrenheit temperature and it's not even noon yet.

So let's start with some basic vocabulary:


WEATHER TALK VOCABULARY
EnglishTagalogIlokano/IlocanoPronounce like this
HotMainitNapudot, NabaraNah-poo-doot, nah-bah-rah
ColdMalamigNalam-ekNah-lam-ek
WetBasaBasaBah-sah
DryTuyoRagangirangRah-gah-ngee-rung
Humid/humidityPagkabasaNasalimuotNah-sah-lee-moo-ot
RainUlanTudotoo-do
SnowNiebeNiebeNee -e-be
IceYeloYeloYe-loh
StormBagyoBagioBug-yo



Tell me how hot it is...

When it comes to the weather...Pudot = Heat (Noun)  and Napudot = Hot (Adjective).

Napudot - It's hot
Napuduten- It's already hot 
Nagpudot- It's very hot
Napudpudot - It's hotter (use for comparison)
Pummudot- It's going to become hot
Pimmudot - It became hot


It's hot right now - Napudot tatta  (Nah-poo-doot tat-tah)

It's already hot - Napuduten  (Nah-poo-doot-ten)

It's very hot today - Nagpudot tatta nga aldaw (Nug-poo-doot tat-tah ngah al-dao)
* When you want to emphasize an adjective, you use "NAG" instead of (NA) before the adjective word. 

It's hotter today- Napudpudot tatta nga aldaw (nah-pood-poo-doot tat-tah ngah al-dao)

Wait for the climate to get hot
Urayem nga pummudot iti tiempo (Ooh-rah-yem ngah poo-moo-doot ee-tee tee-yem-po)

The climate became hot
Pimmudoten iti tiempo ( Peem-moo-doot-ten ee-tee tee-yem-po)


How do you feel?


Nabara refers more to body temperature. It's use for describing how you feel  when your body is feeling the heat or the head is in your body.



Nabara - It's hot
Nabaran - It's already hot
Nagbara - It's very hot
Nabarbara - It's hotter
Bumara - It's going to get hotter
Bumarbara - It's in the process of getting hotter
Bimara - It got hotter


My head is hot - Nabara daytoy ulok (Nah-ba-ra die-toy oo-look)

My head is very hot - Nagbara daytoy ulok(Nug-bah-rah die-toy oo-look)

I'm hot/I'm very hot - Nabaraak/Nagbaraak (Nah-bah-rah-ack/ Nug-bah-rah-ack)
You're hot/You're very hot - Nabaraka/Nagbaraka(Nah-bah-rah-kah / Nug-bah-rah-kah)
*This word is use more often when you physically feel hot. For example, you are running a fever.

I'm hot/I'm feeling hot - Mapudutanak ( Mah-poo-doo-tan-ack) 
* This word describes a state of being hot. For example, you are directly under the sun or you are feeling the heat from a heater.

My head is hotter now - Nabarbara daytoy ulok tatta (Nah-bar-bar-ra die-toy oo-look tat-tah)

I feel like it's getting hotter - Kasla bumarbara iti riknak (Kas-lah boo-mar-bar-ra ee-tee reek-knock)

Yes, I really feel hotter - Wen, Bimmara nga talaga iti riknak ( Wen Beem-mah-rah ngah tah-la-ga ee-tee reek-knock)

Napudot or Nabara. If you get these two words mix up, it's okay. They still mean the same thing and it's acceptable to use one or the other. Don't sweat it!


Speaking of sweat, outside my house is  HOT AND HUMID! 

Summer time in West Texas is fairly dry but today it's not. We've gotten more rain this summer so it's more humid than normal. In other parts of Texas, like Houston, the humidity level is high most of the time. I prefer the dry heat because it is easier for me to cool down. Just stay inside!


Nasalimuot - It's humid
Nasalimuoten - It's already humid
Nagsalimuot - It's very humid
Nasalsalimuot - It's more humid
Sumalimutot- It's going to be more humid
Sumalsalimuot - It's getting more humid
Simalimuot- It got more humid

It is humid - Nasalimuot (Nah-sah-lee-moo-ot)

It is very humid - Nagsalimuot (Nug-sah-lee-moo-ot)
* This is the word I grew up using.


Here are some words that are use to describe humid:

Nadam-eg  ( Na-dum-egg)

Naagneb (Nah-ugh-neb)

Nalnaab (Nahl-nah-ab)


But when your tongue is burning and you're referring to food:

Gassang=Hot/Spicy

Nagasang (nah-gah-sung) - It's hot/spicy

Naggasang (nagh-gah-sung) - It's very hot/spicy

Nagasgasang (nah-gus-gah-sung) - It's  hotter/spicier

Permi ti gasang na! (Per-mee tee gah-sung nah!) - It's Super hot!



So innak pay agpalammiis. Inton Maninsan Manen!

(So I'm going to go cool off. Until Next Time Again!)

And next week, we will learn how to COOL off in Ilokano.

Siak ni Gigi


NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person to say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. 

For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.

Thursday, April 20

Greeting in Ilokano Basics Part 2

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Learning to greet people is a great start to practice your Ilokano. It's also one of the first things you should learn in any language. A simple hello is all you need to get a smile out of someone.


On one of our older post, we gave a short lesson on pronunciation and enunciation with basic greeting words. Revisit Greetings Part 1 for a refresher.


Revisit:


Now we are going to add to this: Part 2


You want to tell someone hello or ask how they are doing?

Kumusta/Musta - Hello/Hi/How are you?

Kasano ngay ti aldaw mo / yo? Or Kumusta ti aldaw mo / yo? - How is your day?

Kasano ngay ti riknam / yo ? or Kumusta ti riknam/ yo ? - How are you feeling?


When leaving or trying to leave a conversation

 Apannakon / kamin (Up-pahn-nak-koon / Kah-meen)  : I am going leaving now / We

Umunaakkon / pay (oo-moo-nah-ak koon / pie) : I'm going first then ( basically means, "I'm                 leaving/goodbye) in a polite way

Sige ngarud (See-geh ngah-rood): Okay then. (Short way to say you're done talking as you leave to go. It's an informal       way goodbye without being rude)

Inton Maminsan manen (in-toon Mah-meen-sun mah-nen): Til next time

Ngarud/en (ngah-rood/den) - Then (added to the end of a phrase to emphasize the verb) 
  
            For Example: Apannak ngaruden (up-pun-nak nga-rood-den) - I'm going then



Baldo is on his way into town when he bump into his neighbor Dodoy.

Dodoy: Kumusta ka?
             Hi. How are you?
Baldo:  Mayat met latta, kumusta ka ngay met?
            I'm still good, how are you also?
Dodoy: Mayat met
            Good also
Baldo:  Kasano ngay ti aldaw mo?
            How is your day? ( Literally translate as "How is the day of yours")
Dodoy: Ay ket naimbag ti aldaw ko tatta, sika ngay?
            (Oh well good is my day right now, and you?) Oh well my day is good right now, and you?
Baldo:  Madi ti riknam tatta nga aldaw.
            (Literal translation: Not good, my feeling today) I'm not feeling well today
Dodoy: Apay? Kasano ngay ti riknam?
            Why? How are you feeling?
Baldo:  Kasla agsakitak sa met
            It's like I'm I may be sick
Dodoy: Ket apanka agpadoktor a ngarud
            And go see a doctor then 
Baldo:  Wen apanak ngarud agpdoktor. Apannak ngaruden, umunakkon.
            Yes, I'm go see the doctor. I am going then, Goodbye.
Dodoy: Wen, sige ngarud. Inton maminsan manen.
            Yes, okay then. Til next time again.

Greeting someone during different time of the day.

    Naimbag nga aldaw (Nah-eem-bug ngah Ahl-dao) - Good Day 

    Naimbag a bigat (Nah-eem-bug ah bee-gut) - Good Morning

    Naimbag a malem (Nah-eem-bug ah mah-lem) - Good Afternoon

    Naimbag a rabii (Nah-eem-bug ah rah-bee-ee) - Good Night/Evening


So after greeting his neighbor, Baldo went into town to see the doctor.

Baldo:   Naimbag nga malim yo doktor
             Good afternoon Doctor
Doktor: Naimbag nga malim mo met Baldo.
             Good afternoon to you also Baldo
Baldo:   Wen doktor, addaak. Umayak agpacheck-up.
              Yes Doctor, I am here. I came to gave a check up.
Doktor: Apay adda ka met, kumusta ni riknam?
             Why are you here? How are you feeling?
Baldo:   Madi ti riknam, kasla agtrangkaso ak sa.
             I'm feeling not so good. I feel like I have the flu.
Doktor: Umayka ditoy. Agtugaw ka pay ta kitaik no inya ti sakit mo.
            Come here. Just have a seat and I'll look to see what your sickness is.


Baldo found out that he was only coming down with a cold. The doctor gave him a prescription and send him on his way.

Baldo: Ay sus! agsakitak manen!
Oh man! I'm sick again!

Lesson Vocabulary:

Sika/Mo- You/your
Siak/Ko - Me/my
Mayat- good
Rikna-feeling
sakit/agsakit - sick/feeling sick
Trangkaso - flu
Madi- not
Met- also
Manen-again
Wen-yes
Tatta - right now
Adda - there is
Umay/Umayyak - come/I'm coming
Kita/kitaik - look/I look
Tugaw/agtugaw - seat/to have a seat or sit down


So how much of the story were you able to interpret simply by recognizing the words and phrases? Now move your mouse over the space under the sentence and highlight it. The translation should appear when highlighted.

For some of you, that may be a lot to take in. Take your time and the best way to remember these simple phrases is by practice saying it out loud.

We will post these phrases on our Facebook page on a daily basis, so be sure to subscribe and like us on Facebook.

Inton maninsan manen! Until Next Time Again.

Happy Learning.

NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.