Thursday, April 27

Ilokano Weather Part 1: How to say HOT in Ilokano

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HOT! HOT! HOT!


I don't know about you but it is HOT in this part of the woods. This West Texas heat is no joke! So for this week's lesson, we are talking about the weather, HOT weather, that is.

So, How's the weather is your area? Hope it's not as scorching hot as where I am. Outside is reaching the three-digit in Fahrenheit temperature and it's not even noon yet.

So let's start with some basic vocabulary:


WEATHER TALK VOCABULARY
EnglishTagalogIlokano/IlocanoPronounce like this
HotMainitNapudot, NabaraNah-poo-doot, nah-bah-rah
ColdMalamigNalam-ekNah-lam-ek
WetBasaBasaBah-sah
DryTuyoRagangirangRah-gah-ngee-rung
Humid/humidityPagkabasaNasalimuotNah-sah-lee-moo-ot
RainUlanTudotoo-do
SnowNiebeNiebeNee -e-be
IceYeloYeloYe-loh
StormBagyoBagioBug-yo



Tell me how hot it is...

When it comes to the weather...Pudot = Heat (Noun)  and Napudot = Hot (Adjective).

Napudot - It's hot
Napuduten- It's already hot 
Nagpudot- It's very hot
Napudpudot - It's hotter (use for comparison)
Pummudot- It's going to become hot
Pimmudot - It became hot


It's hot right now - Napudot tatta  (Nah-poo-doot tat-tah)

It's already hot - Napuduten  (Nah-poo-doot-ten)

It's very hot today - Nagpudot tatta nga aldaw (Nug-poo-doot tat-tah ngah al-dao)
* When you want to emphasize an adjective, you use "NAG" instead of (NA) before the adjective word. 

It's hotter today- Napudpudot tatta nga aldaw (nah-pood-poo-doot tat-tah ngah al-dao)

Wait for the climate to get hot
Urayem nga pummudot iti tiempo (Ooh-rah-yem ngah poo-moo-doot ee-tee tee-yem-po)

The climate became hot
Pimmudoten iti tiempo ( Peem-moo-doot-ten ee-tee tee-yem-po)


How do you feel?


Nabara refers more to body temperature. It's use for describing how you feel  when your body is feeling the heat or the head is in your body.



Nabara - It's hot
Nabaran - It's already hot
Nagbara - It's very hot
Nabarbara - It's hotter
Bumara - It's going to get hotter
Bumarbara - It's in the process of getting hotter
Bimara - It got hotter


My head is hot - Nabara daytoy ulok (Nah-ba-ra die-toy oo-look)

My head is very hot - Nagbara daytoy ulok(Nug-bah-rah die-toy oo-look)

I'm hot/I'm very hot - Nabaraak/Nagbaraak (Nah-bah-rah-ack/ Nug-bah-rah-ack)
You're hot/You're very hot - Nabaraka/Nagbaraka(Nah-bah-rah-kah / Nug-bah-rah-kah)
*This word is use more often when you physically feel hot. For example, you are running a fever.

I'm hot/I'm feeling hot - Mapudutanak ( Mah-poo-doo-tan-ack) 
* This word describes a state of being hot. For example, you are directly under the sun or you are feeling the heat from a heater.

My head is hotter now - Nabarbara daytoy ulok tatta (Nah-bar-bar-ra die-toy oo-look tat-tah)

I feel like it's getting hotter - Kasla bumarbara iti riknak (Kas-lah boo-mar-bar-ra ee-tee reek-knock)

Yes, I really feel hotter - Wen, Bimmara nga talaga iti riknak ( Wen Beem-mah-rah ngah tah-la-ga ee-tee reek-knock)

Napudot or Nabara. If you get these two words mix up, it's okay. They still mean the same thing and it's acceptable to use one or the other. Don't sweat it!


Speaking of sweat, outside my house is  HOT AND HUMID! 

Summer time in West Texas is fairly dry but today it's not. We've gotten more rain this summer so it's more humid than normal. In other parts of Texas, like Houston, the humidity level is high most of the time. I prefer the dry heat because it is easier for me to cool down. Just stay inside!


Nasalimuot - It's humid
Nasalimuoten - It's already humid
Nagsalimuot - It's very humid
Nasalsalimuot - It's more humid
Sumalimutot- It's going to be more humid
Sumalsalimuot - It's getting more humid
Simalimuot- It got more humid

It is humid - Nasalimuot (Nah-sah-lee-moo-ot)

It is very humid - Nagsalimuot (Nug-sah-lee-moo-ot)
* This is the word I grew up using.


Here are some words that are use to describe humid:

Nadam-eg  ( Na-dum-egg)

Naagneb (Nah-ugh-neb)

Nalnaab (Nahl-nah-ab)


But when your tongue is burning and you're referring to food:

Gassang=Hot/Spicy

Nagasang (nah-gah-sung) - It's hot/spicy

Naggasang (nagh-gah-sung) - It's very hot/spicy

Nagasgasang (nah-gus-gah-sung) - It's  hotter/spicier

Permi ti gasang na! (Per-mee tee gah-sung nah!) - It's Super hot!



So innak pay agpalammiis. Inton Maninsan Manen!

(So I'm going to go cool off. Until Next Time Again!)

And next week, we will learn how to COOL off in Ilokano.

Siak ni Gigi


NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person to say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. 

For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.

Thursday, April 20

Greeting in Ilokano Basics Part 2

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Learning to greet people is a great start to practice your Ilokano. It's also one of the first things you should learn in any language. A simple hello is all you need to get a smile out of someone.


On one of our older post, we gave a short lesson on pronunciation and enunciation with basic greeting words. Revisit Greetings Part 1 for a refresher.


Revisit:


Now we are going to add to this: Part 2


You want to tell someone hello or ask how they are doing?

Kumusta/Musta - Hello/Hi/How are you?

Kasano ngay ti aldaw mo / yo? Or Kumusta ti aldaw mo / yo? - How is your day?

Kasano ngay ti riknam / yo ? or Kumusta ti riknam/ yo ? - How are you feeling?


When leaving or trying to leave a conversation

 Apannakon / kamin (Up-pahn-nak-koon / Kah-meen)  : I am going leaving now / We

Umunaakkon / pay (oo-moo-nah-ak koon / pie) : I'm going first then ( basically means, "I'm                 leaving/goodbye) in a polite way

Sige ngarud (See-geh ngah-rood): Okay then. (Short way to say you're done talking as you leave to go. It's an informal       way goodbye without being rude)

Inton Maminsan manen (in-toon Mah-meen-sun mah-nen): Til next time

Ngarud/en (ngah-rood/den) - Then (added to the end of a phrase to emphasize the verb) 
  
            For Example: Apannak ngaruden (up-pun-nak nga-rood-den) - I'm going then



Baldo is on his way into town when he bump into his neighbor Dodoy.

Dodoy: Kumusta ka?
             Hi. How are you?
Baldo:  Mayat met latta, kumusta ka ngay met?
            I'm still good, how are you also?
Dodoy: Mayat met
            Good also
Baldo:  Kasano ngay ti aldaw mo?
            How is your day? ( Literally translate as "How is the day of yours")
Dodoy: Ay ket naimbag ti aldaw ko tatta, sika ngay?
            (Oh well good is my day right now, and you?) Oh well my day is good right now, and you?
Baldo:  Madi ti riknam tatta nga aldaw.
            (Literal translation: Not good, my feeling today) I'm not feeling well today
Dodoy: Apay? Kasano ngay ti riknam?
            Why? How are you feeling?
Baldo:  Kasla agsakitak sa met
            It's like I'm I may be sick
Dodoy: Ket apanka agpadoktor a ngarud
            And go see a doctor then 
Baldo:  Wen apanak ngarud agpdoktor. Apannak ngaruden, umunakkon.
            Yes, I'm go see the doctor. I am going then, Goodbye.
Dodoy: Wen, sige ngarud. Inton maminsan manen.
            Yes, okay then. Til next time again.

Greeting someone during different time of the day.

    Naimbag nga aldaw (Nah-eem-bug ngah Ahl-dao) - Good Day 

    Naimbag a bigat (Nah-eem-bug ah bee-gut) - Good Morning

    Naimbag a malem (Nah-eem-bug ah mah-lem) - Good Afternoon

    Naimbag a rabii (Nah-eem-bug ah rah-bee-ee) - Good Night/Evening


So after greeting his neighbor, Baldo went into town to see the doctor.

Baldo:   Naimbag nga malim yo doktor
             Good afternoon Doctor
Doktor: Naimbag nga malim mo met Baldo.
             Good afternoon to you also Baldo
Baldo:   Wen doktor, addaak. Umayak agpacheck-up.
              Yes Doctor, I am here. I came to gave a check up.
Doktor: Apay adda ka met, kumusta ni riknam?
             Why are you here? How are you feeling?
Baldo:   Madi ti riknam, kasla agtrangkaso ak sa.
             I'm feeling not so good. I feel like I have the flu.
Doktor: Umayka ditoy. Agtugaw ka pay ta kitaik no inya ti sakit mo.
            Come here. Just have a seat and I'll look to see what your sickness is.


Baldo found out that he was only coming down with a cold. The doctor gave him a prescription and send him on his way.

Baldo: Ay sus! agsakitak manen!
Oh man! I'm sick again!

Lesson Vocabulary:

Sika/Mo- You/your
Siak/Ko - Me/my
Mayat- good
Rikna-feeling
sakit/agsakit - sick/feeling sick
Trangkaso - flu
Madi- not
Met- also
Manen-again
Wen-yes
Tatta - right now
Adda - there is
Umay/Umayyak - come/I'm coming
Kita/kitaik - look/I look
Tugaw/agtugaw - seat/to have a seat or sit down


So how much of the story were you able to interpret simply by recognizing the words and phrases? Now move your mouse over the space under the sentence and highlight it. The translation should appear when highlighted.

For some of you, that may be a lot to take in. Take your time and the best way to remember these simple phrases is by practice saying it out loud.

We will post these phrases on our Facebook page on a daily basis, so be sure to subscribe and like us on Facebook.

Inton maninsan manen! Until Next Time Again.

Happy Learning.

NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.

Thursday, April 13

The Lord's Prayer in Ilokano

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At a young age, I learned the Lords Prayer in Ilokano first then I learned it in English. A common prayer that is a lot of time taken for granted , The Lord's Prayer is not only spiritual but it is a helpful tool in learning the Ilokano language. Many of you already know this prayer in English/Tagalog by heart so it'll be easier for you to translate in your head as you read the Ilokano version.




The Lord's Prayer
"Amami"
(Ilokano Version)

Amami, nga adda sadi langit,
(Um-mah-mi  ngah  ad-dah  sah-dee  lah-ngeet)

Madaydayaw kuma ti Nagan mo.
(Ma-die-die-yao  koo-mah  tee  Na-gun moh)

Umay Kuma ti pagariam.
(Oo-my  koo-ma  tee  pah-gaar-yum)

Maaramid kuma ti pagayatam
(Mah-ah-rah-meed  koo-mah  tee  pah-gah-yah-tum)

Kas sadi langit kasta met ditoy daga.
(Kas  sah-dee  la-ngeet  met  dee-toi  dah-gah)


Itedmo kadakam ita ti kanenmi iti inaldaw.
(Ee-ted-moh kah-dah-kum ee-tah tee kah-nen-mee ee-tee ee-nal-dao)

Ket pakawanennakami kadagiti basol mi,
(Ket  pah-kah-wah-nen-nah-kum-mee  kah-dah-gee-tee  bah-sool  mee)

A kas met panamakawanmi kadagiti naka basol kadakami.
(Ah  kas  met  pah-nah-mah-kah-wun-mee  kah-dah-gee-tee nah-kah  bah-sool  kah-dah-kum-mee)

Ket dinakam iyeg iti pannakasulisog,
(Ket  dee-nah-kum  ee-yeg  ee-tee  pun-nah-ka-soo-lee-soog)

No di ket isalakannakami iti dakes.
(Noh  dee  ket  ee-sah-la-kun-nah-kum-mee ee-tee dah-kes)


Iti pagariam, iti Panakabalinmo, ken iti gloriam
(Ee-tee  pah-gaar-yum,  ee-tee  pah-nah-kah-bah-leen-moh, ken  ee-tee glor-ryam)
nga awan patinggana
(ngah ah-wun pah-teeng-gah-nah
Amen


And this is how it will translate in English, which is different from the English version of the Lord's Prayer.

Our Father who is in heaven,
May your name be honored
May your kingdom be ours
Your will be done,
Here on earth like it is in heaven
Give us now what we will eat everyday
And forgive us of our sins
as we forgive those who sin against us
Do not allow us into temptation
And deliver us from all evil
Because your is the kingdom,
The power and the Glory
that has no limit
Amen

Of course, 
here is the English version most people are familiar with.

Our Father, thou art in heaven,
Hallowed be thy Name. 
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
As it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
As we forgive them that trespass against us.
And lead us not to temptation,
But deliver us from Evil.

For thine is the kingdom,
The power and the glory 
Forever and Ever.
Amen.



Happy Easter Everyone!



Inton maninsan manen! Until Next Time Again.

Happy Learning.

NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.


Thursday, April 6

Ilokano Greetings for the Holidays

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As the holiday approaches, it's time to brush up on some Ilokano phrases to impress the in-laws and friends. So here's a short cheat sheet for those who just got excited after reading the first sentence.

Holiday/Celebration Greetings

Happy Birthday - Naragsak nga Panagkasangay
                             (Nah-rug-sak ngah pa-nahg-kah-sang-ai)

Happy Valentines - Naimbag nga aldaw ti puspuso
                               (Nah-eem-bug ngah al-dao tee poos-poo-so)

Happy Thanksgiving - Naragsak/Naimbag nga Panagyaman
                                    (Nah-rug-sak / Nah-eem-bug ngah pa-nahg-ya-mahn)

Merry Christmas - Naragsak/Naimbag nga Paskua
                               (Nah-rug-sak / Nah-eem-bug ngah Pas-kwa)

Happy New Year -Naragsak nga baro nga tawen
                             (Nah-rug-sak ngah ba-ro ngah tah-wen)

When in doubt, just say your English holiday greeting. Of course, when you encounter Ilokanos at one of the many holiday parties that you will be attending, you will need a conversation freshener, enough to get some "Ooh" and "Aah" or "Ala!" followed by giggles and laughter.

When that happens, please don't be offended. Ilokanos gets very excited when someone of other races speaks their language. The initial response is to giggle and laugh not because they are making fun but because they are impressed with your effort.

Simple phrases to remember:

Hello/How are you?- Kablaaw / Kumusta kayo? / Musta apo ( you add "apo" to a grandpa/grandma)

Nice to meet you - Naragsakkak a maamammo ka (Nah-rug-sak-kahk ah mah-um-um-moh kah)

I am fine - Nasayatak met (Nah-sa-yah-at-tak met) / Mayat met (mah-yaht met)

Thank you - Agyamanak (Ugh-yah-mahn-nahk)

I am (your name) - Siak ni_____( Syak nee......)

I am so and so's spouse/girlfriend/boyfriend/friend

Siak ti asawa/nobya/nobyo/gayyem ni (your partner's name)
( Syak tee ah-sah-wah/noob-yah/noob-yo/guy-yem nee......)

And when everything else fails to juggle your memory or you've had one too many San Miguel by then,

Saan ko maawatan (Sa-an- koh mah-ah-wah-tun) = I don't understand

 Diak makaawat (Jack mah-kah-ah-what) = I am not able to understand

or as my husband like to say:

Diak ammo, saan ko maawatan, tulingak!
(Jack uhm-mo, Sa-an- koh mah-ah-wah-tun, too-ling-ak)

which means.... I don't know, I don't understand, I am deaf!)

So if you get a chance to attend a Filipino party, GO! You would not want to miss the awesome food and the company with the corny cheesy jokes. Plus you get to practice and show off what you've learned with Ilokano  Learner.

But first, go through all the greeting lessons we've posted. These two in particular.

Greetings Part 1

Common Phrases


Inton Maminsan Manen

Happy Learning!

NOTES: These lessons are designed with the English Speakers in mind. The pronunciation is spelled out to emphasize sounds of the English language and alphabet to help the person say it correctly in sounds that they are familiar with. For Tagalog/Filipino readers seeking to utilize our lessons, read the words in your native tongue and do not follow the suggested pronunciation.





Thursday, March 30

Love Speaks Ilokano

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Okay so we missed the love month of February but that's okay because "LOVE" happens year around. So we have compiled a list of vocabulary words and phrases relating to the word "LOVE".

We've received a lot of requests in the love category...... so here is our list to get you started.



Basic Words:
Love - Ayat 
Like/want - Kayat
Pretty/ Beautiful - Napintas
Handsome - Nataraki / guwapo / pogi
Delicious - Naimas
Smell good - Nabanglo
Sweet - Nasamit
Smile - Isem
Sexy - sexy
Heart - Puso
Kamay - Ima
Found - Nabirukan
Feeling - Rikna
Call - tawag
Sorry - pakawan
Kasar - marriage/wedding

Titles:

Beloved - Dungo
Nobyo - boyfriend
Nobya - girlfriend
Baket - Old lady / Wife
Lakay - Old man / husband
Asawa - spouse
Abalayan / Bayaw - in law

Compliments:

You are beautiful - Nagpintas ka
You are handsome - Nagtaraki ka / naggwapo ka
Your smile is beautiful - Nagpintas ti isim mo
You are so nice to me - Nagsingpet ka ken siak
I like being with you - Kayat ka nga kadkaddua
You're so sexy - Nagsexy ka 

Love Phrases:

I love you - Ayayatin ka
I like you - Kayat ka
I'm interested in you - Kursonada ka
My heart is yours - Kanyam daytoy pusok
Only you - Sika Laeng
Awan sabalin - There's no one else





Will you marry me? 

  • Kayat mo nga asawain dak? (Do you want to be myspouse / marry me?)
  • Asawain dak, wen? (Be my spouse / Marry me, yes?)
  • Kayat ko nga pakasaran ka ( I want to marry you)
  • Kayat mo nga pakasaran dak? ( Do you want to marry me?)
  • Intan agkasar (Let's go get married)


image courtesy of clipartfox.com

Are you in the dog house?

I hate you - kabusor ka
I don't like you - Saan ka nga kayat
I didn't mean it - Saan ko ingagara
I won't do it again - Saan ko uulitinen / araramidenen.
Please don't leave me - Pangaasim saan dak a panawan.
Forgive me - Pakawanen dak
Come back to me - agsubli ka keniak


We will update this from time to time and add more to the list. If you have a phrase/s you want to learn, send us a message and we will gladly add it to the list. Goodluck with the Cupid or trying to get out of the dog house.


Until Next Time - Dita Kayon.